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GIVING WHILE LIVING

GREAT OUTCOMES

Living organ donations allow for optimal surgery scheduling, better genetic matches, and may reduce the risk of organ rejection. Also, many kidney donor operations can be done with laparoscopic surgery.

CAREFUL EVALUATION

Living donors are carefully evaluated to ensure they are healthy enough to donate and thrive post-surgery. We have two kidneys; we only need one to live a normal life.  If you donate a part of your liver, your liver will regenerate until it’s almost the original size.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

If you decide to become a living organ donor, there are financial resources available to help cover your travel expenses and make it easier to take a short break from your job.

GIVING HOPE & LIFE

Between 2010 and 2015, 3.1% of all living kidney donations were non-directed, meaning the donor gave their kidney to a complete stranger.

TYPES OF LIVING DONATION

A living donor can give a directed donation, meaning that their donated organ will go to a friend, family member, or person in need that they name. Some extremely altruistic people give non-directed donations that go to someone they don’t know at all. Another option is paired donation, which lets a donor give an organ to someone they don’t know in exchange for a similar donation to a loved one.

WHO CAN DONATE

Living donors must be at least 18 years old and in good overall health both mentally and physically. Some conditions that might preclude you from donation include diabetes, cancer, HIV, or hepatitis. All approved living donors are paired with an Independent Donor Advocate to help them fully understand their decision and assist them through the process.

FIND A BUDDY

Choosing to give a living donation can be an overwhelming experience. Having someone to talk to who has been through the process before can help you sift through your feelings, concerns, and questions. Get the support you need and make a trusted friend by signing up for our Find a Buddy program.

BETH BRONNER

“I was very, very lucky, and I’m very proud. I had 11 people, five cousins and six friends who volunteered to get tested for me, and I had two cousins who actually fought over who was going to get to give me the kidney.”

RESOURCES

Visit our resources page to learn about organizations and programs that could be helpful to you throughout each stage of your transplant journey.